REACH - University of Louisville

History

History of Resources for Academic Achievement (REACH)
2000-2010

You may also view the History of REACH in PDF form.

Resources for Academic Achievement (REACH) was created on July 1, 2000. At the same time, the Division of Transitional Studies was eliminated. REACH began as a unit organized under the Academic Provost’s Office and reporting to the new Dean for Undergraduate Studies. The first director of REACH served as the administrator for the following REACH components all located in Strickler Hall: a collaborative partnership program between Jefferson Community and Technical College (JCTC) and UofL entitled the Pathways for Success Program which offered onsite JCTC developmental mathematics and reading courses for any enrolled UofL student with mathematics or reading deficiencies; a UofL Math Lab for drop-in support for JCTC developmental courses; Undergraduate Studies (UGS) Advising for all “undecided” students and for students enrolled in Continuing Studies; Learning Resources organized to offer academic support services and specialized retention programs. In 2003, the position of Dean of Undergraduate Studies was eliminated; REACH was reorganized with a new director and began reporting to the Associate Provost for Undergraduate Studies. Over the past ten years, REACH has greatly changed and its development has been the result of the university’s focus on extending and intensifying academic support for all undergraduate students. Today REACH is a large and complex learning resources unit still organized under the Academic Provost’s Office and reporting to the Vice-Provost for Undergraduate Affairs and Enrollment Management. The current executive director for REACH is the administrator for multiple academic support services and retention programs. REACH conducts these services and retention programs in several instructional centers located in Strickler Hall, a suite of offices and a welcome center, computer centers in Ekstrom Library and the Miller Instructional Technology Building, and in classrooms all around campus.

Then:

In 2000-01 Learning Resources was one of three primary components of REACH, the Pathways to Success Program with JCTC and the UGS Advising Program.

The Learning Resources components were the Scheduled Tutoring Program, Supplemental Instruction (SI) and the Student Success Seminars. Usage data shows the following for the 2000-01 academic year:
739 students (duplicated headcount) for 3,657 contact hours used Scheduled Tutoring.
835 students (duplicated headcount) for 5,385 contact hours used Supplemental Instruction (SI).

Learning Resources employed 2 professional staff, 1 GSA and 54 tutors.
(Learning outcomes are addressed in the 2000-2001 REACH Annual Report.)

NOW:

In 2009-10 REACH has developed into a complex learning resources unit. UGA Advising is organized under REACH as the REACH Academic Development Office. The JCTC Pathways Program continues to offer onsite developmental mathematics courses.

Tutoring services are offered from the following locations:
Learning Resource Center (LRC)
Math Resource Center (MRC)
Onsite Virtual Math Center (VMC)
Computer Resource Centers in Ekstrom Library and MITC
Digital Media Suite

Tutoring services include the Scheduled Tutoring Program, the Supplemental Instruction Program (SI), and the Learning Assistance Program (LA) in the LRC; drop-in Mathematics tutoring and Math Seminars in the MRC, drop-in Mathematics tutoring and the online Virtual Math Center offering resources and tutoring in the onsite Virtual Math Center (VMC);

Retention programs include: the GEN 105 Program; REACH Ambassador Peer Mentoring Program; retention programs offered for Porter Scholars, Cardinal Covenant Program, for students admitted by exception and advising for Continuing Studies students from the Academic Development Office; Student Success Seminars.

Usage data shows the following for the 2009-10 academic year:
1,987 students (non-duplicated headcount) for 11,534.3 contact hours for Scheduled Tutoring.
1,727 students (non-duplicated head count) for 12,458.1 contact hours for Supplemental Instruction (SI).
1,218 students (non-duplicated head count) for 5, 067.6 contact hours for Learning Assistance (LA).
1,736 students (non-duplicated head count) for 14, 973.6 contact hours for the Math Resource Center (MRC)
1,002 students (non-duplicated head count) for 42, 139 hits for the online Virtual Math Center (VMC using Blackboard)
856 students (non-duplicated head count) for 5,428.4 contact hours for the onsite Virtual Math Center (Math Computer Center)
3,136 students (non-duplicated head count) for 18, 794.2 contact hours for the Ekstrom Computer Resource Center (CRC in Learning Commons)
2,954 students (non-duplicated head count) for 16, 458.9 contact hours for the iTech Zone (Computer Resource Center in collaboration with IT)

REACH 2009-10 usage data for all tutoring services: 8,735 students (non-duplicated head count) for 128,159.3 contact hours.

REACH employs 15 professional and classified staff, 16 GSAs, and an average of 150 tutors and peer mentors each academic year.

*(Learning outcomes are addressed in the 2009-2010 REACH Tutoring Services Annual Report and in the 2009-2010 REACH Retention Programs Annual Report.)

REACH Highlights 2000-2010:

*since 2003, has provided academic support services for 25,000 individual students for 485, 000 student contact hours--almost half a million hours of engagement with undergraduate students for academic support outside of the classroom

*earned international certification for all tutoring programs at Level I, Level II and Level III, Master Tutor, from the National College Reading and Learning Association (CRLA)

*earned international certification for the Ambassador Peer Mentoring Program at Level I and Level II from the National College Reading and Learning Association (CRLA)

*awarded the university's Disability Awareness Award for 2003

*awarded national Web site awards from the National College Learning Center Association (NCLCA) and the Learning Support Centers in Higher Education web portal (LSCHE) in 2005, 2006, 2008 and 2009

*awarded the National Association for the Tutoring Profession’s, “2009 Tutoring Program Award of Excellence,” on April 5-8 at the ATP annual conference in Albuquerque, NM

*nominated Scot Howard, LRC Master Tutor and SI Leader, who was awarded the National Association for the Tutoring Profession’s, “2009 Peer Tutor of the Year Award,” on April 5-8 at the ATP annual conference in Albuquerque, NM.

*provided on-campus employment for talented students ---7 or the 14 Fulbright winners for UofL for 2010

*provided on-campus employment for talented students---the university's first Rhodes Scholar, Monica Marks (former REACH tutor)


*Brief REACH Development Time Line:

2000-2001
REACH is organized as three primary components. Each has specific functions related to university retention. A new REACH Web site, a first newsletter, the “RAP Sheet,” is created, and the first REACH out events for students are offered which continue today as the Welcome Back, Fall Festival, International Thanksgiving, and Valentine’s Day events. A drop-in Computer Science Lab continues as a computer service center on the 3rd. floor East of Strickler Hall. By previous arrangement, the Mathematics coordinator serves as Conference Chair and the Learning Resources coordinator serves as Program Chair for the National Association for Developmental Education’s (NADE) annual conference in Louisville in the spring.

JCTC Pathways for Success

• UofL begins new selective admission requirements which reduce the number of low performing students admitted to the university. JCTC first offers multiple sections of JCTC developmental mathematics and reading courses on the UofL campus as the Pathways to Success Program, a gateway program for students denied admission to UofL at JCTC and a program offering developmental courses onsite for students with academic deficiencies enrolled in UofL.

• JCTC Mathematics courses are supported by a REACH drop-in Math Lab in a classroom on the 2nd Floor East of Strickler Hall.

Undergraduate Studies Advising

• UGS Advising provides unit advising for the university’s undecided students and for Continuing Studies students.

Learning Resources

• Learning Resources develops a Learning Resource Center (LRC) located on the 4th. floor East of Strickler Hall in the former location of the Writing Center. The new center has two academic support programs offering tutoring services: Scheduled Tutoring and Supplemental Instruction (SI).

• Learning Resources employs adjunct faculty and offers six sections of GEN 101 for “conditionally-admitted students in the College of Arts and Sciences for the fall semester. This specialized GEN 101 is phased out in the spring.

• Learning Resources creates a new summer bridge program, Summer Transitions 2000, in July for students denied admission to UofL which offers course instruction in mathematics, reading and writing, in addition to community events and Wednesday Seminars on academic strategies. Summer Transitions is offered for 2001, but then discontinued.

• Learning Resources offers a course in study strategies for June for the university’s PEPP Program.

• Learning Resources provides instructional seminars on learning styles and study strategies using the MBTI for multiple sections of the centralized and campus-wide GEN 101 course.

• Learning Resources presents a variety of Student Success Workshops and REACH for Success Seminars in collaboration with the Counseling Center, Writing Center, and Access, adult and commuter student services in the fall and spring.

• Learning Resources creates a new pilot, Probation Workshops for students enrolled in the College of Business (COB).

• Learning Resources creates a new pilot using a new learning assistance model for one section of ANTH 201 in the spring.

• Learning Resources creates a new program, “Finals Blitz,” offering extended tutoring hours and extra exam reviews for fall and spring semesters which continues.

2001-2002
REACH continues organized as three primary components. An Early Warning Alert (EWA) is piloted as a possible best practice for retention. The EWA process includes a midterm request to faculty for referrals and a follow-up printed letter sent to students from Learning Resources.

JCTC Pathways for Success

• JCTC Pathways continues to offer developmental mathematics and reading courses onsite as the Pathways Program.

Undergraduate Studies Advising

• UGS Advising continues to provide unit advising for the university’s undecided students and for Continuing Studies students.

• UGS Advising begins to administer The College Student Inventory as an assessment tool to identify “at-risk” or prone to drop out students and to serve as a retention “best practice.”

• UGS Advising offers the first campus-wide, “Career Expo,” in collaboration with the academic advising units as a majors and career fair to promote student awareness and to encourage students to give serious attention to this decision.

Learning Resources

• Learning Resources expands beyond the Learning Resource Center to add another academic support center, a new Math Resource Center, which provides new drop-in tutoring support for students enrolled in 100 and 200 level mathematics courses eliminating the need for SI attached to general education mathematics courses and providing significantly more tutoring support for mathematics for undergraduate students. The former Math Lab classroom is eliminated and several additional classrooms are collapsed and renovated in the center section of Strickler Hall 2nd. Floor East to create this large open center.

• Learning Resources develops and offers a full Learning Assistance Program (LA) as a companion program to SI, but as a more flexible program offering supplemental study sessions, exam reviews and sometimes student assistant office hours as requested for multiple sections of History and Anthropology courses in collaboration with the department chairs and specific faculty making LA requests.

• Learning Resources begins to use AccuTrack, a student tracking software in the Learning Resource Center and new Math Resource Center, to provide for more accurate tracking of student usage data.

2002-2003
REACH is reorganized with the resignation of its first director and institutional changes. The Director for Learning Resources becomes the new Director for REACH. REACH continues with a new focus on the expansion of learning resources.

JCTC Pathways to Success
• JCTC continues to offer developmental mathematics courses and reading courses onsite as the Pathways Program.
Undergraduate Studies Advising
• UGS Advising continues to provide unit advising for the university’s undecided students and for Continuing Studies students and continues to administer the College Student Inventory as an assessment for “at-risk” or prone to drop out students.

• UGA Advising sponsors a reception for students post- College Student Inventory on Saturday afternoon of the first Welcome Weekend.

• UGS Advising changes the “Career Expo” to a “Majors Day” and plans this event for the first time in collaboration with the academic advising units.

REACH

• REACH participates in the first Welcome Weekend and specifically co-sponsors the REACH/Alumni Supper on Friday evening and offers a “Making College Count” session for students on Sunday afternoon.

• REACH relocates the Learning Resource Center to the 1st. Floor West of Strickler Hall. SK 111, 109, and 107 are acquired and undergo major renovations to change from an IT storehouse of old equipment and media distribution area to a new academic center with two small interior classrooms, 1 large interior office, 1 large electronic classroom, and an extensive open tutoring space with appropriate furniture and receptionist area.

• The Learning Resource Center changes the nature of its tutoring appointments for the Scheduled Tutoring Program to initiate TAGS, tutor assisted group study. Scheduled Tutoring is offered small groups, 2-5 students only, but can now provide more tutoring and more tutoring sessions for more students. Individual appointments continue to be offered for disabled students who need accommodation by working in collaboration with the Disabilities Resource Center.

• REACH expands to include the Computer Resource Center on the 3rd. Floor East of Strickler Hall. New programming begins in this center that transforms the center from a standard computer service center to an academic center for assisting and tutoring computer literacy including providing e-mail instruction to GEN 101 enrolled students.

• REACH changes the method of staffing for the general Survivor Skills Seminars. Learning Resource staff instruct these sessions in the new electronic classroom, SK 111.

• REACH develops its first Tutor Handbook for all tutor training using printed copies with student employees during the 2003 spring.

2003-2004

REACH
• REACH increases student usage significantly in the Appointment Tutoring Program, Supplemental Instruction Program (SI), Learning Assistance Program (LA), and Math Resource Center (MRC).

• REACH creates a new program, the Supplemented Study Program, modeled after the Farris State University model of required learning assistance. This new program replaces the need for Pathways reading courses by offering required and structured reading and study strategies instruction in addition to content tutoring for linked general education courses in Biology, Geography, Political Science, and Social Problems.

• REACH creates a new online tutoring service for Mathematics, the Virtual Math Center, using Blackboard and planned to provide students with opportunities for evening and weekend tutoring. This new online program is piloted with a first course, MATH 111, in the spring.

• REACH develops a more extensive and new series of Survival Skills Seminars offered for all first-year students enrolled in the first-year experience courses required by the College of Arts and Sciences, College of Business, and Nursing Program resulting in an increase number of seminars offered, 160 seminars, for fall.

• REACH offers drop-in tutoring in the Computer Resource Center for CIC 100 and CIS 201 as a new initiative to support students enrolled in these beginning programming courses for the College of Business and renovates this center. All computers are replaced, Uniprint is installed, and the center’s security system is expanded in the spring.

Undergraduate Studies Advising

• UGS Advising continues to provide unit advising for the university’s undecided students and for Continuing Studies students and to administer the College Student Inventory as an assessment to identify “at-risk” or prone to drop out students in collaboration with the UGA Office for Retention Management and Research which informs academic unit advisors of CSI results.

JCTC Pathways for Success

• JCTC Pathways offers only developmental mathematics courses onsite as the Pathways Program.
Developmental reading courses are no longer offered through this program.
This program remains the same currently and continues offering developmental course sections each semester.

2004-2005

REACH

•REACH initiates the use of online scheduling for the first time to create Tutor Assisted Groups (TAGS) for scheduled tutoring in the Learning Resource Center. This new scheduling is made possible by a new feature from AccuTrack called AccuWeb. Students can now schedule sessions from any computer location on campus or at home.

• REACH initiates working with 300 level courses in the Learning Assistance Program adding HIST 304 and ANTHRO 314 and 321 for the academic year.

• REACH expands the Virtual Math Center to include all lower division Mathematics courses tutored in the onsite Math Resource Center beginning in the fall. Resource materials and synchronous tutoring are offered for the following courses: Math 105, 107, 111, 112, 180, 190, 205, 206 & EAC 101 and 102. All students for all course sections are entered in the Blackboard course which continues to serve as the framework for online Mathematics tutoring assistance.

• REACH continues to expand its seminar series to include a series of COMPUTER BASICS Seminars in the spring. The first series of seminars is targeted toward students who need computer literacy skills. These sessions are also open to staff and faculty. Topics include knowing a computer's parts, managing files and directories, UofL Netmail and Blackboard, making the most of Microsoft Word, Excel and Power Point and using the library's online resources.

• REACH conducts a major revision of its Tutor Handbook and publishes this text again in the fall.
REACH creates a mini-course using Blackboard for REACH Tutor Training based on the revised fall Tutor Handbook in the spring.

• REACH initiates the first Monitored Academic Assistance Program (MAPS) offered in two different programs for students in the College of Business and for Porter Scholars in collaboration with UGS Advising, the College of Business, and Minority Academic Enhancement Program (MAEP) and Porter Scholars Advising in the spring.

• REACH provides the first monitored academic support for a university organization, by organization request and with the participating students’ permission, with the UofL Debate Society.

• REACH creates a new peer mentoring program, the REACH Ambassadors, using second year students as mentors for first-year students beginning with 10 selected mentors and 125 student mentees recruited in Summer Orientations. The program addresses social, academic, and leadership opportunities for participating students.

• REACH continues the Supplemented Study Program offering required and structured reading and study strategies instruction and content tutoring for linked general education courses in additional courses: Biology, History, Psychology, and Social Problems.

• REACH reintroduces a summer bridge program for Mathematics called the Summer Advantage Program which provides five weeks of onsite instruction. The completion of this fee-based program earns students an opportunity to post test for possible advancement in mathematics placement prior to the fall semester.

Undergraduate Studies Advising

•UGS Advising continues to provide unit advising for the College of Arts and Sciences’ undecided students and instructs these students in special sections of the GEN 101 course for the fall. This advising is discontinued when the College of Arts and Sciences begins new advising for its undecided population in the spring.

• UGS Advising continues to administer the College Student Inventory as an assessment for “at-risk” or prone to drop out students and assumes responsibility for advising follow-up university-wide for students identified as drop out prone on the CSI. A pilot program is offered for College of Business students who are identified as “high dropout prone” in the spring.

• UGS Advising collaborates with the UGS Office of Retention Management and Research to offer a “Back on Track” Program for students under 60 credit hours to investigate the attrition of these students and to support their reinstatement.

• UGS Advising continues to advise Continuing Studies students.

2005-2006
REACH is reorganized to include Undergraduate Studies Advising. In the new reorganization, this advising unit becomes an Academic Development Office operating under the supervision of REACH. The director and supplemental advisors who are reclassified as Academic Development Specialists continue as supplemental advisors who focus more on academic coaching in scheduled appointments with students.

• REACH redesigns its Web page expanding the site with new sections for each tutoring service and retention program, and with additional sections for “About REACH” (mission, letter from director, reports), online submission for the REACH application and tutoring request forms, a new Academic Development Specialists page, and new AccuWeb link to provide online scheduling for the Scheduled Tutoring Program.

• REACH’s new Web site receives Honorable Mention (4th. place) in the international and annual competition sponsored by Learning Support Centers in Higher Education (LSCHE), a national professional organization for academic support centers. REACH received the honor of posting its LSCHE Web site Excellence Award on the REACH Web site.

• REACH receives Level I and Level II international tutor certification for all of its primary tutoring programs, the Scheduled Tutoring Program, the Learning Assistance Program, the Math Resource Center, and the Computer Resource Center, from the College Reading and Learning Association (CRLA), a national professional organization certifying academic support programs. (The Supplemental Instruction Program cannot be certified by organizations other than Supplemental Instruction, Inc.). This international certification is based on documentation submitted by REACH for two academic years showing all tutor training (agendas, handouts, presenters’ materials) for each program and for each semester and all data collection and record keeping maintained during this two year period.

• The Scheduled Tutoring Program (LRC) for the first time expands its tutoring to offer additional 300+ level courses as requested by tutee applications. Tutoring is offered for 11 additional courses at the 300+ level.

• The Math Resource Center undergoes major renovations during the late fall in Strickler Hall, RM 226. Tutoring is relocated to Strickler Hall 106 West beginning November 17 to continue to support tutees. In SK 226, a new venting system and new lighting are installed, and the ceiling is completely replaced in addition to much needed repainting and recarpeting. A large office, Strickler Hall 248, is also renovated and a door created to connect this additional space to the MRC. This new room becomes the new location for the Virtual Math Center (VMC) and now includes three computers, hutches and the resources/materials collection for the VMC.

• The Computer Resource Center initiates a project with the Arts and Sciences Biology faculty to offer a location for lab training sessions for BIOL 244. The CRC provides tutoring in Excel for BIOL 244 students following their beginning lab training for the rest of the semester.

• REACH graduate student assistants (GSAs) for the first time instruct all Student Success Seminars in the fall and spring. Training is provided to the GSAs during their orientation/training activities before the beginning of the fall.

• The REACH Academic Development Office (ADS) continues to advise Continuing Studies students, to administer the College Student Inventory, and to provide follow-up to drop-out prone students identified by the CSI.

• The REACH ADS Office continues to plan and conduct a Majors Fair in collaboration with academic unit advisors.

• The REACH Academic Development Office initiates a retention program for freshmen admitted to the university by exception. This program is a collaboration between REACH and the University Admissions Office and provides structured academic support and counseling to students identified as “high risk.”

• REACH co-sponsors the first campus-wide financial literacy event in collaboration with the Student Financial Aid Office and the KY Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA) called “Dollars and $ense” in the spring.

• REACH continues to refine the REACH Ambassadors Peer Mentoring Program, Early Warning Alert (EWA) Program, Student Success Seminars, MAPS Program with the Porter Scholars, Supplemented Study Program, and Summer Advantage in Mathematics Program as retention programs.

2006-2007

• REACH’s Web site receives a 2nd. Place in the international and annual competition sponsored by Learning Support Centers in Higher Education (LSCHE), a national professional organization for academic support centers. REACH receives the honor of posting its LSCHE Web site Excellence Award on the REACH Web site.

• REACH is cited by the university president’s office and the Louisville Courier Journal (October 6, 2006) as one of the factors in UofL’s increase in undergraduate graduation rates.

• REACH reapplies and receives the three year international recertification for Level I and Level II for all of its primary tutoring programs, the Scheduled Tutoring Program, the Learning Assistance Program, the Math Resource Center, and the Computer Resource Center, from the College Reading and Learning Association (CRLA), a national professional organization certifying academic support programs. (The Supplemental Instruction Program cannot be certified by organizations other than Supplemental Instruction, Inc.). This new certification is valid from 2007-2010.

• REACH collaborates with the Delphi Center for Teaching and Learning and Ekstrom Library to propose a new concept which will promote information literacy, computer science literacy and media literacy in connected first floor locations in Ekstrom Library. This concept, the Learning Commons, is accepted by the Provost’s Office and the Dean of Libraries. Renovations in Ekstrom Library begin to create the new Learning Commons in the spring.

• REACH proposes the creation of an expanded onsite Virtual Mathematics Center to better support students in Supplemented MATH 111 and to increase the ability of students to work online and receive tutoring. Renovations for the new VMC begin in Strickler 331, the former location of the Computer Resource Center, in the spring.

• REACH reorganizes the Scheduled Tutoring Program and the Supplemental Instruction Program. Each program is assigned to a different program coordinator. This reorganization encourages more development of the SI program and results in more study group sessions and larger numbers of students participating in SI for this academic year.

• The Math Resource Center changes the name of the summer bridge program for Mathematics called the Summer Advantage Program to ADVANCE in Mathematics for the 2006 summer semester.

• The Scheduled Tutoring Program begins offering tutoring to any UofL student who is preparing for CLEP exams as a means for earning course credit.

• The REACH ADS Office hosts a campus-wide CSI workshop with a national speaker for university advisors on June 28. As many as 50 advisors participate in this event to enhance their use and interpretation of the CSI. The ADS staff by agreement of the directors of all undergraduate academic advising units, meet with students identified by the CSI as “prone to drop out” and meet with “non-prone-to-drop-out” students in the Schools of Dentistry, Education, Engineering and Nursing. CSI appointments are first required for these student groups. A negative service indicator is set to be removed from students’ accounts by ADS following CSI appointments.

• The REACH ADS Office continues the Students Admitted by Exception program and conducts the first Open House during Welcome Weekend for these students with a panel of REACH graduate students and peer mentors to give information on transitioning to college and to answer questions. Students sign-up for first appointments. Weekly planners are given to participating students.

• REACH continues the Early Warning Alert for both fall and spring, but conducts extensive research following the EWA in spring and summer 2007, including a national review of EWA-type programs, a review of all UofL benchmark institutions, and a review of innovative practice as regards warning systems to encourage student success. Research suggests common problems associated with EWA programs include the lack of instructor compliance, the lack of timely notification to enable effective interventions, and the lack of student compliance in seeking academic support services or other corrective actions. REACH recommends replacing the EWA process of one time printed letters with an electronic campus-wide referral system available at any time for student referrals.

• REACH collaborates with Housing and Residential Life, UofL Properties, and the UGA Office of Research and Retention Management to conduct an online survey of all residential students in the spring. The survey’s purpose is to learn more about students’ study behaviors, the locations residential students use for study, and to better understand residential students’ tutoring needs. Results of the survey suggest new programming for REACH, possibly at midterm and an expanded Finals Blitz, to be planned with residential staff and Ekstrom Library.

• The REACH Ambassador Program and the Freshmen LEAD program in Student Affairs collaborate to create a proposal to join both programs during this academic year. This collaboration results in a 2 year sequential process for student leaders, (1.) leadership training with a focus on personal development during the Freshmen LEAD program (2.) leadership through service during the REACH Ambassador Peer Mentoring Program. The acceptance of this proposal by the Academic Provost’s office changes the number of REACH Ambassadors from 15 to 50 peer mentors for the beginning fall.

• The REACH Ambassador Peer Mentoring Program collaborates for the first time with the First Year Guides in Residential Life to offer social events within the residence halls hosted by the First Year Guides. During these events, REACH Ambassador program information and applications are made available to First Year Guide mentees.

• The REACH ADS Office begins to develop initiatives targeted specifically toward second-year students at UofL. A major initiative, The Second-Year Connection newsletter, is designed to keep second-year students informed about activities and events of special interest as well as study and time management tips and information about university resources. In all, 6 issues of this newsletter are published and send online to second-year students, university staff, and posted at the REACH Website.

• The REACH ADS Office collaborates with the College of Arts and Sciences to offer, “Bringing Academic Back,” a voluntary workshop for students on academic warning during the spring. The workshop focuses on helping students develop strategies for achievement and on learning about support services that could assist student success.

• REACH co-sponsors the 2nd. campus-wide financial literacy event reorganized to be a Financial Fiesta, an information fair with donated lunch for students, that provides both off campus and on campus vendor tables with information, games and prizes themed to increase students’ knowledge and awareness of financial literacy. The event is planned in collaboration with the Student Financial Aid Office, KY Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA), UGA Research and Retention Office, Office of Campus-wide Advising, the College of Education Center for Economic Education, the University Career Center, Peer Health Advocates, and the College of Business.

• The REACH ADS Office and Career Development Center co-sponsor the annual Majors Day planned by a campus-wide committee for the spring. Committee representatives are from REACH, the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Business, Dental Hygiene, the School of Education, the School of Nursing, Speed Engineering School, Honors, Liberal Studies, Undergraduate Advising Practice, and the Office of Retention Management and Research. Majors Day provides an opportunity for students to speak with faculty representatives and advisors from the undergraduate academic majors and representatives from the Dental School, Kent School of Social Work, Law School and Medical School.

•The REACH Newsletter begins a new focus to showcase student tutors called, “The Tutor Perspective,” reported in each issue. REACH coordinators select outstanding tutors to write about their experiences for each issue with the goal of sharing information on both the skill set needed to be excellent tutors and the benefits of tutoring.

2007-2008

• REACH initiates the use of Tutor Trac on the UofL campus in the fall. Prior to implementation, extensive planning and development is conducted by REACH professional staff with the Office of Institutional Research and with Information Technology resulting in the establishment of a campus-wide server for Tutor Trac data and an interface between Tutor Trac and Peoplesoft Student Records.

• REACH pilots the use of SAGE in the fall, a Tutor Trac module, for use as a campus wide student referral process to replace the Early Warning Alert (EWA) conducted by REACH in past academic years. REACH implements the campus wide use of SAGE advertising this new referral process to all academic colleges in the spring.

• REACH in collaboration with Ekstrom Library completes renovations on the library’s first floor to create a new Computer Resource Center, part of the Learning Commons, to promote information literacy, computer science literacy and media literacy in connected first floor locations in Ekstrom. The new CRC opens in the fall and participates in the opening celebration of the Learning Commons on October 31 attended by the academic provost, dean of libraries, and administrative staff and faculty.

• The Computer Resource Center, the Delphi Center for Teaching and Learning, and Ekstrom Library collaborate to create a new Digital Media Suite to be part of the Learning Commons. The CRC participates in the Delphi Center’s “TechnOGear” event on March 4 showing a preview of the new equipment and software in the Digital Media Suite.

• REACH completes renovations in Strickler Hall 331 and opens the new onsite Virtual Math Center in the fall. The VMC begins a new partnership with the College of Arts and Sciences to provide academic support students for students enrolled in Supplemented Math 111 for the fall and spring.

• A new online version of the ADVANCE in Mathematics Program is offered for the first time in the summer. Both the onsite and online versions of ADVANCE are offered for the first time in a seven week format during the fall and spring. Both ADVANCE versions begin at the beginning of each semester ending at midterm and then begin again at midterm ending at the close of each semester.

• REACH initiates a new Master Tutor Program for returning REACH tutors who have already earned Level I and Level II International Tutor Certification. All center coordinators “coach” participating teams of students conducting discussion sessions on the research and providing practice sessions to assist presentation skills. The first REACH Tutor Conference is held on August 15, 2007. Nine concurrent sessions are presented by Master Tutors in training.

• REACH initiates a new Midterm Blitz entitled “Midterm Blitz: TRANSFORM Your Learning,” as a collaborative program with Housing and UofL Residential Life, UofL Properties (private campus housing), and Ekstrom Library.

• The Scheduled Tutoring Program initiates new free seminars for GMAT, GRE, and LSAT exam preparation as a free service for enrolled students in the spring. Each seminar has four sessions sequenced to assist students to practice significant parts of the exam.

• The REACH ADS Office is first requested to provide supplemental advising for the first cohort of Cardinal Covenant (CC) students and to develop enrichment activities for these students for fall and spring. The ADS Office sponsors a first Welcome Weekend session for CC students, a Welcome Lunch on August 18, to meet with the university’s vice provost, and with representatives of Student Financial Aid, Student Affairs and REACH. CC students are encouraged to meet with their ADS early during their first semester to facilitate their adjustment to the college. During advising appointments, the ADS staff gather relevant information regarding the students’ study habits, career goals, family support systems, work, housing status, and academic needs to help CC students’ college success.

• The REACH ADS Office continues second-year initiatives and leads a Second-Year Planning Committee, comprised of representatives from the academic units and Student Life for the fall and spring.

• REACH is selected to host the regional College Reading and Learning Association’s annual conference. REACH conducts this conference on the UofL campus on April 12. REACH hosts representatives from Ohio, Indiana, Tennessee, Virginia and Kentucky colleges and universities. REACH staff and graduate assistants present sessions on the Learning Resource Center Programs: Scheduled Tutoring, Supplemental Instruction and Learning Assistance.

• The REACH Ambassadors Peer Mentoring Program is co-awarded the “Collaboration Award for 2007” by the Office of Campus Life for program activities conducted with the First-Year Guides, a residential peer mentoring program in the fall.

• The REACH Ambassador Peer Mentoring Program earns Peer Mentor International Certification from the College Reading and Learning Association (CRLA) for Level I (regular) and Level II (advanced). Certification establishes clear standards and guidelines for training, mentoring experiences, selection criteria and evaluation recognized as “best practice.”

2008-2009

• REACH receives the Association for the Tutoring Profession’s, “2009 Tutoring Program Award of Excellence,” on April 5-8 at the ATP national conference in Albuquerque, NM. REACH is selected based on the quality and success of its tutoring services and programs and the range of tutoring services and programs offered.

• Scot Howard, REACH LRC Master Tutor and SI Leader, receives the Association for the Tutoring Profession’s, “2009 Peer Tutor of the Year Award” on April 5-8 at the ATP national conference in Albuquerque, NM. This is the first time that ATP awards both national awards to the same program in the same year.

•REACH receives Master Tutor International Certification (Level III) for the Master Tutor Program from the College Reading and Learning Association (CRLA). REACH is now able to certify tutors at Level III and as Master Tutors if they complete all training and tutoring requirements of this program.

• REACH is awarded a 3rd. place 2008 Website Excellence Award from the National College Learning Center Association (NCLCA) and the Learning Support Centers in Higher Education (LSCHE) in the F2008. This annual national competition recognizes excellence in web page design.

• REACH is selected to conduct a one-half day pre-conference for the College Reading and Learning Association’s national conference on Oct. 21-25 in Cleveland, OH. This pre-conference requires separate payment and registration. The title is, “REACHing a Hallmark: A Formula for a Successful Learning Resource Center.” CRLA pre-conference sessions are generally reserved for mature programs whose staff are known for their expertise in the discipline.

• REACH sends its first staff members to serve on the, “Ideas to Action/Collaborative Learning Community on Critical Thinking,” a campus-wide committee led by the Executive Director for “Ideas to Action.” The committee’s goal is to foster critical thinking skills and community engagement. The focus for each committee member is to create a project that will integrate critical thinking into their programs and make critical thinking a more intentional activity for students.

• REACH conducts a two hour presentation on REACH and a tour of REACH for representatives from the Academic Provost’s Office and for department faculty from the University of Kentucky and also conducts a session on REACH tutoring services for a national representative from the KY-W VA Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP).

• The Computer Resource Center initiates a new collaboration with Instructional Technology to staff the IT computer center on the lower level of the Miller Information and Technology Building (MITC). The agreement drafted by REACH gives responsibility to REACH for the additional recruiting, hiring, and training for student staff for the MITC center and provides additional supervision for all operations of this center during the academic year.

• The Math Resource Center collaborates with the Speed Engineering Advising Center and with key Speed Engineering faculty to create an Algebra Readiness Exam for first-year engineering students. This exam served as an online diagnostic tool during the 2008 summer orientations. REACH professional staff propose and create an accompanying new Speed Calculus Preview Program offered for the first time in July to all new Speed first-time students who earn low scores on the Algebra Readiness Exam.

• The REACH ADS Office creates a new Transfer Connection Newsletter to address information needs for first-time, first year transfer students. This newsletter is sent electronically 6 times during the academic year to all first-year, first-time transfer students. Additional efforts to address the transfer population occur this year, but are discontinued with the university’s creation of the ULtra Transfer Center.

• The REACH ADS Office creates a new Continuing Studies Connection Newsletter to address information needed for all CS students. This newsletter is sent electronically 6 times during the academic year to all first-year, first-time CS students and continues.

• REACH begins an awards program for tutors and for peer mentors to incentivize excellence in tutoring and mentoring in the spring. An “Outstanding Tutor for 2008-09” award is created and an “Outstanding Peer Mentor for 2008-09” award is created. REACH initiates a new collaboration with Student Affairs to present these awards at the campus-wide Student Affairs Awards ceremony in the spring.

• REACH collaborates with the Student Financial Aid Office to conduct a new, “March Money Madness” Program in the spring. The Student Financial Aid Office receives a small grant from Cash Course, an online resource for money management. Activities for the program are developed to create a campus-wide focus on financial literacy skills during the month of March. The program is planned by the Financial Literacy Committee and intended to compliment the Financial Festival offered each fall.

• REACH creates a new online Tutor Handbook posted to the online Tutor Training course in Blackboard. In addition, new modules for Level II training are created and posted to the Blackboard course. These training modules are developed primarily from the past Master Tutor presentations and development is continuing.

• REACH creates a new REACH calendar feature for its Website linked to the new Student Affairs University online calendar in the fall. A REACH representative is assigned to the new Student Affairs University Calendar committee for this academic year and continuing.

• REACH GSAs produce the first REACH video to be used in Summer Orientations with new first-year students in using the resources of the Digital Media Suite. The film is shown at student sessions during the 2008 Summer Orientations. This video project continues as a spring initiative for GSAs.

2009-2010

• REACH is awarded a 2nd. Place 2009 Website Excellence Award from the National College Learning Center Association (NCLCA) and the Learning Support Centers in Higher Education (LSCHE) in the fall.

• The Computer Center participates in the planning and renovation of the computer center in the Miller Information Technology Building (MITC) in spring and summer. The result of this renovation is a completely restructured faculty with all new hardware renamed the iTech Zone and staffed by REACH tutors and GSAs.

• REACH conducts a two hour onsite presentation about REACH and a tour of REACH facilities for the Director for Academic Excellence and Student Performance and a faculty member from Fisk University in Nashville, TN in the fall.

• The Digital Media Suite presents an overview of the Digital Media Suite’s capabilities and shows student videos to Oscar Leon, President of Quality Leadership University in Panama, who visits the UofL campus on April 1. UofL is a Quality Leadership University partner. Mr. Leon plans to create a DMS at his university in Panama.

• REACH provides leadership for the provost’s office as its representative to the Reading Readiness subcommittee organized by the Council on Post Secondary Education (CPE) and chairs the university’s Task Force for College Readiness at UofL. The Task Force is responsible for writing the Task Force for College Readiness Report, 2009-10, sent to the Provost’s Office and to CPE which addresses university policy and procedures for compliance with the new Kentucky Administrative regulation, 13 KAR 2:020.

• REACH creates a new college readiness intervention, GEN 105, as a 1 hour credit course for first time freshmen with reading deficiencies to be offered in collaboration with the College of Arts and Sciences. The new GEN 105 course is offered as a 1 credit hour course and replaces the former Supplemented Study Program which served as required Supplemental Instruction (SI) sessions for reading deficient students. The development of this course requires extensive work with the i2A Critical Thinking Initiative staff and with a team of REACH GSAs who assist the development of a rubric for critical thinking to be used for critical reading assessment. In addition, extensive work is completed with the University Registrar’s Office to revise university policy and postings related to this course.

• The Scheduled Tutoring Program initiates a pilot project in to research the assessment of critical thinking in sequential tutoring sessions. This project is part of the i2A Initiative, the university-wide Quality Enhancement Program. Participating Master Tutors receive training in the Paul and Elder method for critical thinking in tutor training. A critical thinking rubric is created by the program coordinator and implemented by the participating Master Tutors during the fall and spring.

• The Calculus Preview Program is required for the first time in July for all new Speed Engineering first-time students who earn low scores on the Algebra Readiness Exam.
*(Excludes promotions, new staff employment, retirements or resignations of professional staff members, professional staff’s national, regional, state, local and university presentations, elected positions or service in national, state and local professional organizations and university service, memberships in professional organizations, and professional development or continuing education of professional and classified during the past 10 years.)

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